Ana Marie Forsythe

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CNN - Opinion: I Asked Several People Well Past Retirement Age Why They Keep Working. Here’s What They Told Me

CNN - Opinion: I Asked Several People Well Past Retirement Age Why They Keep Working. Here’s What They Told Me

The question for some of us is, why some people want to keep working decades beyond retirement age? CNN Opinion editor Stephanie Griffith asked seven people who are past the conventional retirement age why they are still at the job and got as many responses as there were respondents. Some keep working to make ends meet; others, because they love what they do and can’t imagine giving it up. And some insist that they are better than ever at their chosen professions and love leaning into their growing sense of competence. They continue to work happily and productively, and were happy to explain to us how and why they do it.

Dance Magazine - A High Degree of Success: The Ailey/Fordham Dance BFA Turns 25

Dance Magazine - A High Degree of Success: The Ailey/Fordham Dance BFA Turns 25

The story took flight with a chance encounter at the 60th Street post office in Manhattan. It was the mid-'90s and Denise Jefferson, then head of The Ailey School, and Edward Bristow, then dean of Fordham College at Lincoln Center, would often bump into each other in the neighborhood. At that point, both schools were already looking for ways to expand their relationship, and Jefferson had previously floated the idea of starting a BFA program. While standing in line to buy stamps, Bristow says, their friendly chitchat set in motion an idea to form a planning committee tasked with creating a BFA program that would change the lives of scores of young dancers.

Dance Teacher - The Ailey School’s Ana Marie Forsythe Is on a Mission to Share Horton Technique With the Next Generation

Dance Teacher - The Ailey School’s Ana Marie Forsythe Is on a Mission to Share Horton Technique With the Next Generation

International master teacher Ana Marie Forsythe has devoted nearly 50 years of her life documenting the Lester Horton technique in an effort to preserve it. “Dance has given me gifts that I never realized were possible when I took my first plié,” she says. “I enjoy sharing my breadth of knowledge of the Lester Horton technique because it has been a real gift to me, and I believe we should share our gifts with others.”

Dance Teacher - Why Study Horton

Dance Teacher - Why Study Horton

A dancer discovers the satisfactions of learning the famously demanding technique. Ana Marie Forsythe's eyes twinkle, and a smile plays at the corners of her mouth as she welcomes the 40-plus teachers who are enrolled for her two-week-long Horton teacher-training workshop at the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater studios in New York City - plus me, a dancer and writer, taking part for the day.

Dance Studio Life - Hooked On Horton

Ana Marie Forsythe still remembers her first Horton technique class, in the late 1950s at the Newark Ballet Academy. Former Horton dancer Joyce Trisler came, at Fred Danieli's invitation, to teach class to his students, who Danieli felt needed to be more versatile dancers.

Dance Teacher - Ana Marie Forsythe: How I Teach Horton's Lateral T

Amid the flourishing 1930s American modern dance scene, Lester Horton began shaping a technique that would serve as the foundation for much of the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater repertoire. "Alvin was never shy in saying that Horton was most influential to his choreography," says Ana Marie Forsythe, chair of the Horton department at The Ailey School.

My Body, My Image - Teachers Talking with Horton Master Ana Marie Forsythe

I cannot tell you how immensely excited I was about starting this series. I got the idea after I interviewed Ms. Forsythe for Dance Magazine's Teachers Wisdom section. Since we both work at The Ailey School we see each other almost daily but this was the first time that we had opportunity (and cause) to sit and talk about the work.

Dance Spirit - How To Hinge

You see it everywhere in contemorary and modern choreography. It's the "wow" step that takes you from standing to the floor with just a simple bend of the knees: the hinge.

Showing 110 of 12 Items