Kirven Douthit-Boyd

Kirven Douthit-Boyd
Please Credit Photo:  Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater's Kirven Douthit-Boyd.  Photo by Andrew Eccles 

(Boston, MA) began his formal dance training at the Boston Arts Academy and joined Boston Youth Moves in 1999 under the direction of Jim Viera and Jeannette Neill. He also trained on scholarship at the Boston Conservatory and as a scholarship student at The Ailey School. Mr. Douthit-Boyd has danced with Battleworks Dance Company, The Parsons Dance Company, and Ailey II. He performed at the White House Dance Series in 2010. Mr. Douthit-Boyd joined the Company in 2004.

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Featured Press Coverage

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The Boston Globe - Kirven Douthit-Boyd Takes His Last Boston Bow

You know you’re a local hero when you come back to town with one of America’s premier dance companies and people applaud you just for coming out onstage. That’s what’s been happening for Kirven Douthit-Boyd during Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater’s Boston visits over the past few years.

The New York Times - He Can Fly, In A Flash, Right Before Your Eyes

The New York Times - He Can Fly, In A Flash, Right Before Your Eyes

In 1982, David Parsons made his greatest choreographic discovery: He invented a way for a dancer to fly. "Caught," his signature work that stars a soloist soaring through the air and a strobe light, may last only about five minutes. But this seemingly simple recipe of light and movement results in pure exhilaration.

The Star-Ledger - Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater Premiere: Robert Moses' New 'Lesson' Is A Pleasure

The Star-Ledger - Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater Premiere: Robert Moses' New 'Lesson' Is A Pleasure

With its blank surfaces like molded plastic, the set for Wayne McGregor's ballet "Chroma" suggests one of those anonymous places, like an airport lounge, that empty the modern world of signifiers. Re-assembled for the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater's return engagement now underway at Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, the scenery in "Chroma" deflects a visitor's gaze returning him immediately to a sanitized present.